Studio Habits of Mind

Last week I had the opportunity to co-facilitate a workshop in LA. It was an arts integration conference for California’s Office to Reform Education (CORE). With my colleague, Alane Paul Castro, we presented on the Studio Habits of Mind, an education framework based in Project Zero research. It makes visible what artists do in the studio (not just technique, people!), and it’s a great lens through which to build integrated curriculum. It was an exciting and successful couple of days. If you’re interested in our presentation click here: SHoM Workshop Presentation.

Participants in our SHoM workshop PERSIST in their problem solving and craftsmanship. (They are also just hoping their tower doesn't fall down. When it did they PERSISTED in building it again.)

Participants in our SHoM workshop PERSIST in their problem solving and craftsmanship. (They are also just hoping their tower doesn’t fall down. When it did they PERSISTED in building it again.)

Participants add their ideas and notes to the Studio Habits of Mind Process Wall.

Participants add their ideas and notes to the Studio Habits of Mind Process Wall. Similar to this blog post, I like to make the process visible in the classroom. It is often much more rich than the final product.

I was in the studio during the days leading up to the conference, so I was really thinking about the Studio Habits and how they are true to the artist’s practice. Below you can see how my own personal artmaking process connects to the Studio Habits of Mind.

I look, read, and research other artists so I can UNDERSTAND COMMUNITY.

I look, read, and research other artists so I can UNDERSTAND COMMUNITY.

I REFLECT everyday, before and after making art. A coffee is my company.

I REFLECT everyday, before and after making art. A coffee is my company.

Large, loose ink drawings help me understand my subjects. I start here by looking closely and OBSERVING.

Large, loose ink drawings help me understand my subjects. I start here by looking closely and OBSERVING.

I have to PERSIST everyday, asking myself, "What will I do next." Making decisions is the hardest part of the process for me.

I have to PERSIST everyday, asking myself, “What will I do next.” Making decisions is the hardest part of the process for me.

For me the final piece feels like EXPRESS. It is important work and I am proud to have made it.

For me the final piece feels like EXPRESS. It is important work and I am proud to have made it.

Monoprinting is new for me. I am STRETCHING and EXPLORING. With my stencil underneath the plexi I roll out the ink where I need it to cover the empty spots. I ask other printmakers for advice and experiment with new tricks.

Monoprinting is new for me. I am STRETCHING and EXPLORING. With my stencil underneath the plexi I roll out the ink where I need it to cover the empty spots. I ask other printmakers for advice and experiment with new tricks.

I mix new paints to see what colors I can make. Color mixing feels like DEVELOPING CRAFT to me - I am always learning new things.

I mix new paints to see what colors I can make. Color mixing feels like DEVELOPING CRAFT to me – I am always learning new things.

I often use a camera to help me ENVISION an image before I create it. Here I have someone photography my arms so I can visualize what I have in my mind.

I often use a camera to help me ENVISION an image before I create it. Here I have someone photography my arms so I can visualize what I have in my mind.

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